Media Monitoring

How Halima Aden's Cover Photo In A Hijab And Burkini For Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Changes The Game

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Back in April of 2019, Sports Illustrated Swimsuit, for the first time in its 55-year history, published a model dressed in a hijab and burkini onto its cover. The Somali-American model, Halima Aden, was born in Kenya and lived at the Kakuma Refugee Camp until until she was 7 years old before moving to the United States, according to an article in Harper’s Bazaar. The photo shoot for this cover was shot in Kenya.

Says Halima of this milestone moment in her Instagram: "Don’t change yourself… Change the GAME!! Ladies anything is possible!!! Being in Sports Illustrated is so much bigger than me. It’s sending a message to my community and the world that women of all different backgrounds, looks, upbringings...can stand together and be celebrated."

What Does This Mean For Your Media Coverage?

From a media perspective, this cover photo and fashion spread creates conversation opportunities that can be timely at almost any time for you to create reasons to catch the media’s attention to feature your business. This is referred to as “piggybacking on a trend story” and is an easy trick to thinking up story angles that will catch the attention of a writer, editor or producer. For more on how to piggyback a trend story, see our TuneUp educational series for videos about it.

Examples Of Story Angles Around Halima Aden’s Cover Photo

Story angles will vary based on what your business is. Remember, you have permission to think up a reason for someone in the media to feature you’re business, and you’re doing it via this side-door way. This approach isn’t a “Hey! Feature my business because it’s awesome!”

No no - it’s the approach that is more like: “Hey - about that burkini fashion statement…Did you know that XY and Z…” You’re pitch is not going to sound that casual, but you get the drift. You are the expert. If for some reason this moment in history relates to something in your business - either a product you sell or a philosophy you put out as to what your business stands for - then attempting to attach your brand to this moment is worth the pitch to the media.

Take a look at the photo spread below from Sports Illustrated Swimsuit, and see a list of editorial ideas for directions you can go in when thinking up your pitch:

Story Angles

One way to get a neat story angle idea is to read through the Comments in articles or social media posts about this milestone moment. Reading the comments can be painful if they are from stone-throwers who are uneducated, spiteful, stubborn, or just reactionary. But, they give you an idea of where some people’s heads are at, and a story angle will present itself.

  • Where Did The Burkini Come From? Answer: An Australian designer, Aheda Zanetti, born in Lebanon who moved to Australia when she was 2, designed the burkini for Australian beaches after she watched her young niece play her first game of netball with her school, wearing a team uniform over more traditional Islamic attire. According to an interview with the Washington Post, Zanetti said: “When I looked at her, she looked like a tomato," Zanetti says. "I wanted to make sure we blended in with the Australian lifestyle."

  • Making Up Words (fun with trademarks, for all the attorneys in the house): Zanetti trademarked the word “burkini” and tried to protect it as its popularity grew all over the world. Fortunately or unfortunately for her, the word became like “kleenex” and instead of being traced back to her brand, became a universal word describing a style. Zanetti made up other words too, including “hijood”. According to that Washington Post article, an hijood is “a portmanteau of hijab and hood. It was a breathable and easy-to-put-on garment that would cover the head and allow modest Muslim women to play sports easily.”

  • Is The Burkini New? Not Really! Take a trip back to North America during the 1800-1900s where women waded into the water in full dresses and shoes, which got modified over the years as women moved around more in the water, and needed less fabric to weigh them down.

  • How Is Fashion Formed Through Need? As with North American white women during the 1800-1900s, traditional swimwear designed for modesty and complete sun protection to preserve whiteness was modified as women desired more movement in the water.

  • Is Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Catering To Women Now? Known for objectifying women in barely-there bathing suits, some men in comments felt put out and put upon by seeing a women completely covered. As you can see from the photo shoot above, the designs of the burkini are beautiful, are a celebration of fabric and color, and show the body in a different way. Is a body more exciting because it is fully exposed? Or because it has a combination of tight black with puffs of fabric? Total skin is sort of boring!

  • North American Fashion Is Heading Towards Full Coverage For Sun Protection Anyway: Look at the bathing suits for surfers or kids, and you’ll see lots of tops that are full sleeves. The bottoms are growing longer also as parents go to growing lengths to protect the as yet un-scorched skin of their children.

  • Designer Treatment Of Full Coverage Bathing Suits: Look at the designers in this spread at Sports Illustrated Swimsuit, including Cynthia Rowley and No Ka'Oi.

So many ideas.

How To Use Tin Shingle To Help You Pitch

So you have these ideas. Who do you pitch them to? This is where Tin Shingle’s Media Contact Library comes in really handy. You log into our PR Center, and head over to the Media Contact Library. You can search through the thousands of people we track in that database, and you’d start by putting in some Areas of Interest. Like:

  • “Women’s Interest” (you’d find names like Adam Glassman Creative Director at O, The Oprah Magazine, or Alenna Greco, a former Assistant Editor at Glamour who is now a freelance Editor rock star for Cosmopolitan Magazine.

  • “Designer Fashion” (you’d find Alexandra Michler, former Editor at Vogue and now Director of Fashion Development at Vogue).

So many more directions you could pursue in our Media Contact Library. Next step is to write just the right pitch for that person you found. You won’t be writing the exact same pitch to different editors. While that feels efficient, if often gets you crickets (aka silence and no responses). You’ll want to tailor this pitch to the right person. Tin Shingle’s Pitch Whisperer Community Support Group can help. Share your draft with us first in our safe space Community, and get feedback before you send!

All of this is included in Tin Shingle’s Membership Program. Check it out and get cranking on those pitches to get the word out about your business.

Getting The Scoop On Big Print Publications From A Print Veteran Publisher

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Had the privilege of meeting a real life magazine publisher, Beth McDonough, formerly with the designer favorite magazine, Traditional Home. We talked shop, which for me is giddy because I’m just a babe in the magazine world. Actually I’m not even in the magazine world, as I’m a veteran of digital. As a blogger, I knew how to out-rank web pages of glossy magazines. Thanks to their overly tight controls of how they tried to keep users on their websites, I understood how Google worked, and why Google wanted the more links off the page as possible - a signal of a truly helpful web page.

Today, as corporate print magazines reduce their print schedules, and require consumers to go to the store to pick up from the shelf, I’m still mind boggled as to why that is a good idea. Sounds like veteran print magazine extremely talented editorial staff also don’t see it as a good idea. And the profit sheets of these big corporate publication mergers also don’t see it as a good idea.

Thoughtfulness of a good reading and connecting experience is not factored into the big picture strategies coming from the C Suite, and as readers, we can tell. I’m so lucky to live in the same place as this veteran publisher, and that I could speak to her in real life at one of our local cafes, Ella’s Bellas. Print lives. Advertisers do want to see their branding in print. I am more hopeful than ever at the rise of niche media like mine here at Tin Shingle and at A Little Beacon Blog. The independent publications are going to do well if they know how to bottle this Advertiser enthusiasm. 

Reading Cosmo

Cosmo is filled with mixed messages, but those that are delivered are worth reading - and ignoring the conflicting ones. Was never allowed to read Cosmo when growing up. But right now, it seems useful as a young person to read. Getting familiar with the different sections for Tin Shingle’s business owners, makers and artists who want to use it to get the word out.

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Entertainment Weekly Magazine Goes Monthly - But Keeps Weekly In Title For Now

Entertainment Weekly magazine will go monthly, yet retain the title of Weekly, according to Adweek. The publication, part of the Meredith family of print publications, will start this new schedule in August under new Editor In Chief JD Heyman. The July 5th issue will be the last weekly publication. The new EID is coming from People Magazine. The former EID, Henry Goldblatt, has been at a Entertainment Weekly for 17 years, according to Variety, as highlighted by Adweek.

What Does That Mean For Businesses Looking For Features?

The print publication cycle will slow down a bit, now that there aren’t weekly magazines to churn out. As for an Editorial Calendar, they may release a broad theme to sell to advertisers in a broader way. But, we don’t recommend you to pitch by Editorial Calendar theme anyway because there are way to many ideas out there to wait for a broad theme. 

Tin Shingle will inquire as to what their new print publication cycle will look like, so that we know which months they are working on when. We will also keep our eyes on media moves for those coming and going for our Media Contact Library.

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Sunday's Are Perfect For...Magazine Reading...Here's How To Find The Perfect Media Contact

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You can get into any one of these magazines. Be your business a local shop, or if you’re an expert in your field, or if you’ve developed the perfect toy. Inside the pages of these magazines - and their digital versions - are a myriad of reasons why your business would fit into a story. The key is to unlocking that 1 reason that makes your business a must-write about.

The Perfect Pitch

Sunday's are for being unplugged and dreaming your dreams. That means answering to no one, and listening to the ideas that enter your mind. Being that you're running a business, the ideas #dontstopwontstop. They make you happy! That is why you can use today to discover one special pitch.


Discover The Pitch

You want a feature in a magazine. Or a TV show. Sunday is the day you will pick up 1 magazine, or watch 1 TV show you want your business featured in. You will turn the pages. You will read the articles. You will discover "The Why" of why that writer might cover your business next time. You see how they covered one business, and an idea will click on why they might cover yours.


"Don't I Need To Wait For The Editorial Calendar To Tell Me When To Pitch?"

No. While Tin Shingle does give you instant access to over 100 editorial calendars (Yes, over 100 different publications and growing! Our researcher Yvonne has been busy!), it all comes down to the ideas. Planting the seed.

You can do this. You can plant that seed. You can send a writer an email about your business, just as an FYI, and walk away. You will want to be thinking of so many different story angles. Perfect ones for a particular writer at a particular brand (magazine, digital magazine, TV show). If you’re nervous or unsure about it, you can join Tin Shingle and talk to us in Tin Shingle’s Community using the Pitch Whisperer forum to get feedback.


How To Discover The Best Contact

In your Sunday Reading, here's how you're going to discover who is making the magic. In this video, Tin Shingle's owner and publisher Katie takes you through a little media monitoring of Sift Magazine, a publication that features bakers, bakeries, products, authors, recipes, and more. Another way to discover writers or publications you had no idea about is to tap into Tin Shingle’s Media Contact Library, also a perk of membership with Tin Shingle.

Awe, Dang It!...MSNBC's Your Business With JJ Ramberg Closes Up Shop

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After 12 years on the air every Sunday morning, after what was supposed to be a 6 month run, Your Business with JJ Ramberg has ceased production in December 2018. You can look at their first show announcement over at Ad Week when they were just babies in 2006!

According to a comment down in the show’s Facebook page, the sponsor did not renew for 2019. Which is a stinker because one would think there would be other sponsors out there. According to Wikipedia, American Express OPEN was the sponsor.

JJ Ramberg showcased many small businesses - small and large - including a few Tin Shingle Members - on her show over the years. During that time, she got married and had three kids, who she brought to work at times (see them in the show’s last highlight reel). She also has a podcast, Been There. Built That, that reveals details on journeys to success, what it took to build companies, and turn a No into Yes. The last episode, however, was released in December 2018.

What Will JJ Ramberg Do Next?

She’s unstoppable, so is sure to pop up again somewhere, in probably a big way. The show had a loyal following of small business enthusiasts. JJ knew that small business is personal, and talked about that often in her segments. Your Business was the longest running at MSNBC after Chris Matthew’s Hardball.

JJ is the co-founder of Goodshop with her brother. Goodshop “has the most powerful coupons in the world.” They provide the best shopping deals on the internet, but they also make a donation to the nonprofit or school of your choice for almost every purchase you make. “You also give, at no extra cost,” is their motto.

Goodshop is connected with over 114,000 nonprofits and schools. You can shop for your cause no matter the scale: whether it be your local animal shelter, or a national cancer research organization. If your nonprofit or school isn't listed, you can add them to their list.

Over the past nine years, Goodshop has helped organizations do everything from medical research, to buying books for local libraries, to helping clean up pollution from city rivers. Through deals and coupons generated from the website, Goodshop has raised over $13 million dollars.

We are looking into JJ Ramberg’s next steps for our members-only Media Contact Research Center. If you have a tip, email it into us!

What Business Show To Pitch Now?

Consider Poppy Harlow’s podcast Boss Files with Poppy Harlow. There is of course her show that she co-anchors on CNN, but you should also pursue the podcast. Contact details and ideas for Poppy’s podcast can be found in Tin Shingle’s Media Contact library.

Reading Inc. While Walking: Fitting As The Article Encouraged Moving

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Some people read in the bathroom. I read while walking. Another reason to read in print - most people judge (and shouldn’t) people looking at or reading screen devices. But less so when it’s an actual book, magazine or newspaper! One just looks like a nerd. Who hopefully doesn’t trip while walking.

Anyway - the point is - great point presented by Thomas Goetz in Inc. for his Launch Pad column in Inc. Magazine. He asks: “Can your business pass The Donut Test?” The Donut tastes really good and people really want it, but should you make it for them? What are the consequences of what your business makes (no offense to our donut making friends who have built businesses on donut making shops and other treats!)

Thomas presents his example with with Facebook News Feed, which Greg Marra, then a Facebook product manager talking to Thomas when Thomas was at Wired magazine, likened to people just eating a bunch of donuts. Facebook thought to just give the people more donuts since that’s what they wanted. But if you talk to people, Greg said, they said “I actually want to eat fewer donuts and maybe have a kale smoothie.”

Hard core anti-kale people will throw rotten tomatoes at this concept (I’m eating salted seaweed chips right now!), but you get it. If you keep feeding the people just donuts, the people will be angry, depressed, and probably illness ridden. So can the business switch it up? And is your business doing something to improve people’s lives. Help them move. Feel better with no crashes. Bring people together.

It was a good read.

NEW 2019 Editorial Calendars Added: Elle, O The Oprah Magazine, Men's Health, Shape

THESE 2019 EDITORIAL CALENDARS ARE READY

Editorial Calendars are the grand themes that a magazine rallies around each month or quarter. Magazines want the best of the best, so they make these available to the public to know about. Tin Shingle goes out and gathers all of them to put them into our easy and searchable Editorial Calendar Database to have these ideas at your fingertips. Search by Magazine Title or Area of Interest, let your ideas form, and start pitching!

Latest Magazines Added (get the full list here):

  • Country Living

  • Elle

  • Men’s Health

  • O, The Oprah Magazine

  • Shape

  • WSJ. The Magazine

UPCOMING MAGAZINE THEMES FROM THE EDITORIAL CALENDARS

TIME TIP: Magazines are working on Spring and Summer issues right now.

Town & Country

The Summer Issue PLUS T&C 50 Philanthropists


Vogue Knitting
The Needle Guide (publishes in July)
 

Harper's Bazaar + Elle
The Beauty Issue is coming up for both publications.

Elle Decor
The Italy Issue

Entrepreneur Magazine
The Best Services For Businesses


"HELP! I DON'T KNOW HOW TO USE THESE!"

Fear not - that’s what Tin Shingle’s Community is here for! Everyone needs a jam session to think of reasons why to pitch your favorite, most desired magazine - to give them a great reason of why to feature your business (for free, after all...that's what organic PR is).

STEP 1:
Get the magazine into your hot little hands. Not the tablet, but the paper version. Experience it as it was designed.

STEP 2:
Dive into the magazine and start reading and skimming the articles, the roundups, the call-outs.

Pay attention to what names are credited to writing features that make sense to you - where your brand could fit in.

These names will be your targets. You will want to pitch this person you find with a possible idea, or a set of tips, or a photo of your product and the special angle that makes it a perfect thing for them to feature to their trusted readership.

Keep a record of these names in your PR Planning & Tracking Template. Start following them on Twitter and Instagram to get to know them. What do they like talking about? What are they writing about?

STEP 3:
Pitch them. AKA Email them. There are loads of Tin Shingle Training TuneUps on how to do this, but you’re going to do it. Put yourself out there, and pitch a lot. More than you’re comfortable with. And then follow up. Pitching once is the tip of the ice-burg.

Just make sure you’re pitching someone really relevant to the subject matter, and not someone who you just have the name of :) That’s when the email is sure to get deleted.

"I DON'T KNOW ABOUT THIS...WHY WOULD THEY FEATURE LITTLE OLE ME?"

Because you're special, and you created something awesome. Feeling blocked and nervous is totally normal.

Connect with us directly in Tin Shingle's Community. It's the entry-level of membership, so is super easy and affordable. Gives you access to our online support group to ask your questions, get ideas. Celebrate when you do get press. The All Access level of membership gets you group consulting sessions every other Wednesday, in our Private TuneUp sessions.

Get with us! And start getting yourself out there (even) more.

Media Monitoring: Inc. Features TruDog; Cedits Shopify and Facebook for Growth

Media Monitoring 🧐and inspiration with Inc. Magazine: Tru Dog was featured in the back pages (being that I’m left handed, I read the back first - easier to flip through) for their success in building a frozen raw dog food brand.

Started by Lori R. Taylor after her dog had cancer and she realized that regular dog food was like feeding him fast food every day, and that raw food was closer to a dog’s natural diet. Currently True Dog has $1.5 million in monthly recurring revenue. They tried a subscription model early on, but really surged after investing in a Shopify Plus website and targeted Facebook. Now TruDog is #39 on 2018 Inc. 5000 list.

This profile is in Inc.’s Winter 2018/2019 “Surge Cities” issue. Find out when Other themes are being published in Inc. by taking a peek in their yearly Editorial Calendar, available in a Tin Shingle’s searchable collection. Available at the All Access Pass Level if Membership.

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Glamour Magazine Abandons Monthly Print For Digital Double Down

Photo Credit: Screenshot of article in  The New York Times.

Photo Credit: Screenshot of article in The New York Times.

In January 2018, the stepping aside of Glamour’s longtime editor in chief, Cindi Leive, became official, and, Samantha Barry, a digitally based  journalist with extensive background in the digital television space at CNN Worldwide as an executive producer for social and emerging media, stepped in. Cindi had also been the editor in chief of Self, another print magazine that ceased printing monthly issues.

Monthly Schedule Not A Thing Anymore At Glamour

Upon her arrival, Samantha reduced the numbers of monthly publications from 12 to 11, gave the print magazine a makeover, completely changing the type treatment of the logo, and on the Tuesday before Thanksgiving, announced that the monthly print magazine version of Glamour would cease. 

As first reported by The New York Times, and then The Hollywood Reporter, Samantha stated that she sees no need for a monthly print schedule for the brand anymore. In fact, that Glamour is not just a magazine, that it is a brand. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Samantha stated that Glamour will continue to produce printed editions of its tentpole issues like its “Women of the Year” issue.

In her interview on Cheddar, Samantha is putting Glamour's eggs into the video and event baskets, saying that portions of the Glamour audience are spending more than a minute, sometimes up to half hours on their video content. Being that Samantha comes from the TV world, she is comfortable in this vehicle for storytelling and ad delivery. However, she came from a large cable network - CNN - where their base is TV. In magazines, the base is the book, and the social and the video are the spinoff. Looks like Samantha is bucking this model.

“Doubling Down on Digital”

In her goodbye-to-print email to the editorial staff obtained and quoted by The Hollywood Reporter:  

 "We’re doubling down on digital — investing in the storytelling, service and fantastic photo shoots we’ve always been known for, bringing it to the platforms our readers frequent most. We’ll be expanding video and social storytelling, with new and ambitious series and projects.”

What’s In A Book?

Glamour is committing now to the crowded space of digital with its many mediums, abandoning its loyalty vehicle - the printed book - the magazine. What digital-only producers, editors, and storytellers might not realize is how the printed page carries weight in the hands of their audience. While the people reading the magazine may frequent online spaces more, the printed book helps to define the brand.

According to The New York Times: “Although the number of Glamour’s paid subscribers has remained stable over the last three years, at around 2.2 million, Ms. Barry said it was time for the publication to break away from the printed page.”

The advantage that magazines have over media outlets with no print extension is that they are able to design a deeper experience on the page in the layout of a book. The advantage that digital mediums like blogs have over traditional print is that they understand the online space better and can spread the word farther.

It is the opinion of this writer that the combination of the two - the digital and the print - is an enrichment technique. I say this as a blogger. I am a digitally based producer of content who sees the emotional reactions of people to the printed page, vs the online experience. While the online experience may have more exposure with a larger footprint, the emotional imprint is still there for the printed page. Thereby making the digital version of print even more valuable.

Glamour magazine is in the Condé Nast family. It was founded by the Condé Nast father himself as a vehicle for storytelling of Hollywood Glamour. The magazine’s direction has changed since then, as Glamour has taken on more of an empowerment and educational role for women. Add this move to its evolution.

Vogue’s famed editor in chief, Anna Wintour, is the artistic director for Condé Nast. According to The New York Times article, she enthusiastically supports the release of Glamour magazine’s printed edition, as she did for the ceasing of the printed editions of Self and Teen Vogue. Would Anna encourage the stopping of monthly printing for Vogue magazine? Could you imagine such a thing?

In the Cheddar interview, Samantha acknowledges that there are advertising dollars for print ads, and less so for banner ads on the internet. Branded content can make up for that, as it’s storytelling vs static visual. However, the desire for brands to place print ads still exists, and they are still effective in the impression they leave behind. Therefore, what does it mean to other magazines when a heavy hitter in the industry like Glamour leaves? One answer could be that print ads in existing magazines get more valuable, as there are fewer print outlets. Hence, a possible enthusiastic support by one editor in chief for the decision to abandon print by another editor in chief.

What Does Digital Glamour Mean for Businesses, Artists + PR?

What does this mean for business owners, artists and makers trying to get featured in Glamour? It means a few things:

Pitching Glamour just got more fractured.
You will be pitching tiny corners of Glamour, and by corners I mean video segments, contributing writers and social media handlers. See Tin Shingle’s Training TuneUp here with a contributing writer at GQ and others about how she approaches writing assignments. There may be assignment editors who see everything at the very top line, but they are seeing the overall message delivery for several media mediums. Pitching can be more frequent, different and specialized as you reach more media creators for Glamour. How a feature on your business will get produced has increased in variety.

Crossover for visual storytellers in video and TV just got better.
Opportunities increased for video segments. While writers may still be there to help write the script - if there is one - video editors and producers may be more involved here.

On-Air experts and TV personalities may also have an increased role to play.
The host of a segment will usually be delivering and guiding the segment. Tin Shingle’s Media Contact Lists include a search filter for On-Air Experts, making it easy for you to focus on pitching these types of media creators.